Child Curfew Laws

Curfew laws restrict the right of youngsters (usually under 18) to be outdoors, in the streets or public places during certain hours of the day. Children are required to be at home or an authorized place between a set hour in the evening until a designated time the following morning. Most often youth curfew laws allow for minors to be in public places for an extended time on Friday and Saturday nights. There are certain communities that relax curfew laws in the summer months when schools are closed for break. Others take a different approach and impose more severe time restrictions when children are on vacation or break.

The implementation of laws governing child curfews in the United States of America is a matter of what is known as the police power of the individual states. The federal government does not have the constitutional authority to enforce any kind of national curfew, and this includes child curfew, except in the event of a national emergency. Juvenile curfews have been imposed by state, country, city and township authorities.

Local laws dictate that parents are responsible for the administration and transportation costs of returning a minor to his or her home on a second curfew violation. A child who is a frequent offender of the curfew may be declared a ward of the court and be treated as a status offender. Most curfew laws prohibit minors from being out past 10 p.m. on weekdays and midnight on weekends. There are certain exceptions to the law, however, which allow kids to legally stay out late if they are:

· Running an errand for a parent or guardian

· Participating in a religious, educational or political activity

· Accompanied by a parent, guardian or another adult

· Working or going to or returning from their place of employment

· Returning home from a school, cultural or recreational activity

· Responding to some emergency

What happens when the curfew is broken?

When a child breaks the curfew, he or she could be temporarily detained by the police and then returned home. The State Law also gives the local police officers some flexibility in their enforcement of such curfew laws – if the officer believes the youth has a “legitimate reason based on extenuating circumstances” for the breach. Some of the other penalties for breaking the curfew are:

· Fines (gradually increases for subsequent violations)

· Restrictions of driver’s license privileges

· Possible detention in jail or juvenile hall

· Imposition of community service or compulsory enrollment in after-school programs

Crime against the youth

The primary concern of every parent and the community is obviously keeping children safe and protected. The main objective of implementing juvenile or child curfew is to safeguard the well-being and welfare of children. With the steady rise of crime rates against the youth, the underlying rationale of community members is that children are much safer when they are at home and not outside after a certain time in the evening.

Delinquency by the youth

The second objective is to protect the community as a whole from the miscreant conduct of certain children who are inclined to break the law. Crimes committed by the youth are a major problem in all big cities today. Restricting the presence of unsupervised children from public venues after a curfew each night will reduce the number of children and teens that end up involved in criminal activity and break the law.

Gang violence control

Law enforcement officers maintain that juvenile curfew laws provide them with another weapon in their battle against gang violence. It can be hard to gather substantial evidence to arrest members of a gang, but a violation of curfew law will at least provide officers a chance to interrupt their presence on the streets of a community.

Since child curfew laws vary by locality and government enforcement, it can depend on a number of factors. If you would like to know more about the curfew laws in your community, you could get in touch with your local police department. If your community does not have a curfew, be sure to obtain a list of the laws and a list of the exceptions and exceptional circumstances. Please feel free to express your views on the subject by dropping us a comment below.

Las Vegas and Attorneys

Have you ever been to Las Vegas? What a town. Known as Sin City (I won’t imagine why, maybe gambling, prostitution, nude shows?) This is one town that has to put it’s police force to the task. The police force is one of the most effective agencies in the U.S. The judicial system is ranked as one of the best in the country. Also in this mix is its attorney services.

All the services in the Nevada area are geared for the people. Most of the time, as in other part’s of the country, the issues at hand are accidents, divorce, bankruptcy, criminal cases, corporate blue collar crimes.

Nevada offers much to all visitors and residents.

Gambling, tours, dining, golf, weddings, spas, attractions, nightlife. Before this town became the meca it developed into thanks to Bugsy Segal, a series of natural springs provided water to give the area residents ( Paiute tribes) and travelers refreshing water. The early Spanish exployers named this area Las Vegas meaning ‘the meadows’ or ‘the fertile valleys’. The Mormons (before it was Vegas, Vegas) settled for a spot.

There are many tours available not to miss when in Vegas. Check these out:

* The Grand Canyon
* The Hoover Dam
* The Vegas Strip itself
* The Red Rock & Valley of Fire Tour
* Lake Mead & the Colorado River Tours
* Area 51 Tour ( are you into aliens?)
* Death Valley Adventure Tour and much more.

Las Vegas will be celebrating it’s 105th birthday on May 15, 2010. Much to do. You can now connect with Las Vegas on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Keep in mind this letigous society, as in most towns, attorney’s in Las Vegas specialize their services. Of course you will find lawyers who will do a little of everything.

Services You May or May Not Need:

* Bankruptcy is high on the list no matter what city you live in, not just Las Vegas. Ask how many bankruptcy cases the attorney handles per year, in the last 5 years.There are a few different kinds of bankruptcy. Be sure you will be claiming the correct one.

* Divorce attorney’s are another specialty. You hear about all the weddings in Las Vegas, what about divorces. Be sure again that the attorney has much experience in marital law.

* Taxes. Need I say more. There are attorney’s that specialize in this area. They are Tax Attorney’s. There are a lot folks faced with the IRS and tax issues. Interview a few attorney’s who specialize in the field.

* Employment and Labor Law. Another issue that arises all over the country. Mega law suits from employees against their employers. A recent one is employees against Walmart. It could be a concern about getting paid for over-time or paid as A salaried employee. Check it out with an attorney who really specializes in this field.

*Be sure to check out the attorney and the services you need them for. Don’t be afraid to ask (repeatedly if necessary) anything you feel is important. No question is dumb or stupid. Las Vegas offers many attorney’s easy to access within your search.. Online, yellow pages, or referrals from a person you know.

*When in doubt about finding an attorney, go to the library. There is a book that lists who attorney’s themselves they would use if necessary. There you can also index or research Las Vegas public cases and what attorney was used.. Use all your resources and you will prevail. You need patience and diligence.

Divorce FAQs

Divorce can be defined as a method of terminating a marriage. Legally speaking, divorce gives both individuals the right to remarry, determines the custody and care of children and divides the couple’s property. However, the prerequisites of filing a petition for divorce vary from state to state. Some states demand a residency requirement while others do not.

What are contested and uncontested divorces?

An uncontested divorce is one where the couple decides the terms of divorce and their disagreements are mainly settled outside the court. Uncontested divorces are often less expensive and can be performed without any attorney. Uncontested divorces move faster through the court system. In contested divorces, attorneys handle the case, as it involves major issues, complex legal procedures and heavy financial stakes.

How is property divided in a divorce?

In United States, each state has its own law to determine the division of property. Division of property is done based on two different systems, community property and equitable distribution. Community property is property owned equally by the couple and is divided equally at divorce. States that follow the community property system are California, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Washington, Arizona, Idaho, Wisconsin and Texas. States that follow equitable distribution system consider assets as marital property and each spouse is awarded a percentage of the total value of the assets.

Who will have custody of the children?

In accordance with the best interests of the child, the court shall determine the assignation of parental responsibilities, including parenting time and decision-making responsibilities. This is done giving considerable thought to the physical, emotional and mental requirements of the child.

What is alimony and how much child and spousal support should be paid?

Alimony can be defined as court-ordered support paid by one spouse to another after they are separated. In United States, alimony is often referred to as maintenance or spousal support. In Colorado it is called “maintenance.” However, each state has different laws and this determines the amount and period of alimony. Any alimony order for a wife will come to an end when she remarries. The federal law mandates parents to support their children. Child support laws throughout the United States attempt to ensure the child?s economic support so that its standard of living is preserved.

Criminal Law Information

According to criminal law, crimes are offenses against the social order. In common law jurisdictions, there is a legal fiction that crimes disturb the peace of the sovereign. Government officials, as agents of the sovereign, are responsible for the prosecution of offenders. Hence, the criminal law “plaintiff” is the sovereign, which in practical terms translates into the monarch or the people.

The major objective of criminal law is deterrence and punishment, while that of civil law is individual compensation. Criminal offenses consist of two distinct elements; the physical act (the actus reus, guilty act) and the requisite mental state with which the act is done (the mens rea, guilty mind). For example, in murder the ‘actus reus is the unlawful killing of a person, while the ‘mens rea is malice aforethought (the intention to kill or cause grievous injury). The criminal law also details the defenses that defendants may bring to lessen or negate their liability (criminal responsibility) and specifies the punishment which may be inflicted. Criminal law neither requires a victim, nor a victim’s consent, to prosecute an offender. Furthermore, a criminal prosecution can occur over the objections of the victim and the consent of the victim is not a defense in most crimes.

Criminal law in most jurisdictions both in the common and civil law traditions is divided into two fields:

* Criminal procedure regulates the process for addressing violations of criminal law

* Substantive criminal law details the definition of, and punishments for, various crimes.

Criminal law distinguishes crimes from civil wrongs such as tort or breach of contract. Criminal law has been seen as a system of regulating the behavior of individuals and groups in relation to societal norms at large whereas civil law is aimed primarily at the relationship between private individuals and their rights and obligations under the law. Although many ancient legal systems did not clearly define a distinction between criminal and civil law, in England there was little difference until the codification of criminal law occurred in the late nineteenth century. In most U.S. law schools, the basic course in criminal law is based upon the English common criminal law of 1750 (with some minor American modifications like the clarification of mens rea in the Model Penal Code).

Types of criminal law are: Arrests and Searches, Drug Crimes, Juvenile Law, Drunk Driving / DUI / DWI , Parole, Probation, Pardons, Violent Crimes, White Collar Crimes and Military Law.